A huge thanks for all the support!

I want to offer my heartfelt thanks to all of my supporters. I am so humbled by the trust you have shown me. And a special shoutout to all of my volunteers who distributed signs, and worked so hard to get out the vote.

And I want to congratulate our new mayor, who most likely is going to be Dick Anderson, but I want to thank both Mr. Anderson, and Susan Wahlke, for their many years of selfless service to our community.

I pledge to support our new mayor, and encourage all my supporters to, as well. Now is the time for us all to work together for our greater good.

This is the beginning of great changes for Lincoln City. We’ve shown that together, we really can make a difference. Bless you all.

 

Facebook live stream event

Here’s a Facebook live stream event we held today:

Many thanks to Freddy Garza and Shannon Kokopellinmi for hosting the event.

Answering tough questions on affordable housing and our homeless crisis

Here’s a video of myself, and the other two mayoral candidates, answering tough questions regarding affordable housing, the homeless crisis, and other pressing issues facing Lincoln City at the Candidates Forum at Chinook Winds Casino’s hotel today. A heartfelt thanks to Susan Wahlke and Dick Anderson for their willingness to run, and their years of service to our community.

Housing and jobs are my focus

Here are four BOSS radio spots we created in which I speak on three of our highest priorities: bringing more housing, better jobs, and economic prosperity to Lincoln City:

A special thanks to the production team at BOSS Radio for putting these together so quickly!

Answering the Newport News Times’ Questions

Here are my answers to six questions the Newport News Times recently submitted to myself, and the other Lincoln City mayoral candidates. All of the candidates answers will appear in an upcoming issue of the paper.


1. The city is considering a ban on PLASTIC BAGS. Where do you stand on this issue, and how does it fit into your environmental beliefs?

Attempting to reduced plastic in our environment, although has the best intentions, could produce unintended results. For example, some cities banned “single-use plastic bags.” But retailers just made the bags thicker. Also, instead of banning plastic bags, we may want to consider allowing biodegradable plastic bags. However, the cost is approximately 7x more than a regular plastic bag, which the consumer will have to bear. The state is also considering a statewide band.

2. The city has tackled the HOMELESS CRISIS with mixed results. What should the city do to solve this growing problem?

In 2018, lawmakers added $5.2 million to the state’s budget to cover the rising costs of homeless shelters. In addition to increasing funding for our overnight shelter, city officials should tap into the resources at the state and federal levels and stop undermining the Warming Shelter’s operation in churches. Dating back to my early childhood in LC, shelters have existed throughout our communities — administered through civic leaders like my father.

Our homeless issue also demands intergovernmental collaboration with state, county, and local charities, to assist our most vulnerable receive the counseling, job placement assistance, and support they need. Also, I will prioritize advocating for federal and state assistance related homeless and community service grants to improve funding for the Lincoln City Resource Center and Warming Shelter.

3. AFFORDABLE HOUSING is another hot topic. Some blame empty vacation homes, low wages, or high development costs. What should the city do, if anything, to make housing cheaper?

The cost of affordable housing presents a massive challenge for the next Mayor of Lincoln City. But this is happening across the state. As mayor, my efforts will focus on building new affordable housing by lowering permitting fees, and simplify approval processes. I will also work with Housing and Community Services and Department of Land Conservation and Development and Lincoln County to revamp our zoning rules to allow for tiny homes, and other creative housing ideas. We should also look to other successful models to implement policies that work. I will also work to create a local Housing Authority dedicated to tackling this most pressing issue and build broader regional opportunities with our federal, state, tribe and county partners.

Additionally, we should also strive to expand our economic base, to promote higher wages, so people can afford to get into, and stay in, housing that meets their needs.

4. The city faces growing PERS fees, rising operating costs and pressing infrastructure needs. What’s your philosophy about MUNICIPAL SPENDING, such as your budget priorities?

Our city recently identified over $36 million in much needed sewer repairs. And we just spilled over two millions gallons of sewage into our Siletz Bay. Before we consider more undergrounding of wires, or other beautification projects, I suggest we focus on our water and sewer infrastructure and repairing our roads. I would work to sell some of the over 300 properties the city owns, to help keep our citizen’s property taxes low, and to avoid the time and expense of maintaining them.

PERS is a very challenging issue. Statewide, the PERS system’s unfunded liability is currently about $22 billion. Lincoln City’s current budget doesn’t list what its unfunded PERS liability may be. And the city anticipates a twenty percent or more increase in its PERS contribution beginning next year. So our city will be fiscally challenged by, on the one hand, a growing economy, but the cost of its pension system growing faster. In addition, more government workers are retiring, who now get pensions exceeding $100,000 a year. Therefore, until changes are made at the state level, curtailing the cost at the local level may prove difficult for us. However, we can become leaner in our hiring process, i.e., avoid paying for in-house legal counsel at 250k per year where other cities contract out the cost.

5. Serving in public office involves personal and professional sacrifice, but in Lincoln City it is likely to include ethics complaints, internal investigations, skeptical reporters and outrageous social media attacks. Are you sure you can HANDLE THE JOB, and why?

I have worked with the city administrations of Newberg and Keiser for many years, building platforms to communicate with their citizens, As Mayor, I will be bring that same level of transparency to Lincoln City, to rebuild trust. This will depend on a collaborative style of leadership between the Mayor and City Council members during difficult times. Besides ethics complaints, and internal challenges and media dynamics, it is important that we ensure the delivery of vital public services to Lincoln City residents by working tirelessly to strengthen the partnership of state and local jurisdictions. Revamping our city’s website as a transparency tool that links you to how our local government works and how the budget is constructed is beneficial to our key stakeholders, you. We also need to build social media functions that allow our citizens to directly engage with the city and our councilors, so they are being heard.

6. Please tell our readers something ABOUT YOURSELF — anything we can share to let them know who you are and why you deserve their vote.

In early June 2018, I was urged by Lincoln City residents to run to be mayor. As you may know, I spent my formidable years in Lincoln City, attending Delake Elementary and Oceanlake Elementary. I am excited to return to my childhood home over these last few years and most importantly, I am honored and fortunate to run for mayor. With your support, we can champion the issues that reflect the values you and I share for Lincoln City:

• Work with federal, state, and tribal partners to end youth street homelessness by 2022.
• Establish a program – with vision and compassion – to shelter highly vulnerable homeless residents who are often fearful of accessing regional support
• Expand infrastructure to areas of our cities that have been neglected
• Bolstering our mental-health center through federal and state grants
• Rebuilding Trust and transparency in our local government
• Public safety network by increasing local foot patrols

Answering the News Guard’s latest questions

The News Guard asked each of the Lincoln City mayoral candidates the following questions, but edited the responses for publication. The following are my original responses.

1) Describe your experience/background/skills that will help you guide the city council in consensus during challenging public discussions and decision making.

In early June 2018, I was urged by Lincoln City residents to run for Mayor this honor brought to mind my formative years in Lincoln City, where my family set early Roots to this coastal community. I am excited to return to home over these last few years and most importantly, honored and fortunate to run for Mayor. In 1970, my family bought the current Gerber Tire building. Since 1992 I have been a strong advocate for creating affordable housing for low income families, seniors and vulnerable residents. I am a strong supporter of rebuilding trust in our local government with a level of transparency and openness.

I have worked with the city administrations of Newberg and Keiser for many years, building platforms to communicate with their citizens, As Mayor, I will be bring that same level of transparency to Lincoln City, to rebuild trust. This will depend on a collaborative style of leadership between the Mayor and City Council members during difficult times. Besides ethics complaints, and internal challenges and media dynamics, it is important that we ensure the delivery of vital public services to Lincoln City residents by working tirelessly to strengthen the partnership of state and local jurisdictions. Revamping our city’s website as a transparency tool that links you to how our local government works and how the budget is constructed is beneficial to our key stakeholders, you. We also need to build social media functions that allow our citizens to directly engage with the city and our councilors, so they are being heard.

2) Describe your financial background and how you have effectively managed extensive budgets.

Lincoln City operates under the Council-Manager form of government where the City Manager is the chief executive who provides the leadership and direction for the operation of the government. The manager is responsible for preparing the proposed annual budget, and serves as the policy adviser to the Mayor and City Council.

Also, the League of Oregon Cities (LOC) and the Annual Conference bring together cities from around Oregon to engage us in thought-provoking discussions and multiple ways to network with state, county and business professionals. LOC also provides the opportunity to “find a mentor, get a sneak peek at emerging technology, and hone your leadership skills.” Many individual cities in Oregon are also moving towards mayoral caucus to advocate local issues to state lawmakers and bring a single voice for additional resources.

3) What do you see as the top issue and challenge facing Lincoln City, now and into the future, and how would you best attempt to solve that issue?

Regional collaborations with our surrounding jurisdictions – on issues of transportation, social services and policy is a must. Lincoln City can’t do it alone but must turn to our partners and regionalize instead of becoming too insular. We need new vision for LC that will position us for prosperity in the future. This means that we must make tough budget decisions to address the issues that will face our communities — rising PERS cost, and dramatic cuts to social services. So new leadership must revisit the cost for city services; and look at regionalizing some service wherever possible because cities can’t go it alone.

Expanding economic opportunity in our region and working collaboratively on the social services — specific to Lincoln City – is at the top of most council leaders’ agendas. Therefore, if our city officials are seen to be advancing urgent priorities—economic mobility, housing affordability, transportation and infrastructure investment, among others, then this will strengthen our working relationships, and most importantly, Lincoln City’s strategies for broader regional opportunities with our federal, state, tribe and county partners.

OAMP Executive Director Kristi Wallace voices support

Here is Kristi Wallace, Executive Director of the Oregon Association of Mortgage Professionals, voicing her support of my efforts to protect consumers:

Here is the full text of Ms. Wallace’s statement:


I’m Kristi Wallace. I’m the Executive Director of the Oregon Association of Mortgage Professionals. I have worked with David Dahle for three years, as he served on our Board of Directors. In 2003, he was President of the Association, and he helped lay the foundation for numerous wonderful things that happened to the Association, including tripling the membership from 250 members to 750 members, and in also passing laws in Oregon to help protect consumers. Dave has been a great asset to the Association, and I have personally enjoyed working with him.

News Guard Q&A

Here are my answers to three questions The News Guard recently submitted to me:

Question 1: We are sure you understand the need for a city councilor and our city mayor to have deep skills and experience to be able to comprehend and effectively lead the city move through challenging issues, such as city budgets, land use projects, and enhancing community livability.

Answer: I believe the job of the City councilors and Mayor is to work closely with the City Administrator’s Office and different city departments to prioritize resources by enacting a balanced budget, approve and guide land use projects and enhance community livability. One of the key City Manager responsibilities is planning and implementing the city’s budget. But the Council and Mayor set the policy priorities for where resources should be prioritized. The Mayor and Council also must ensure that the operating income is carefully managed to fund essential services such as housing, health care and economic development for future growth. We also must prioritize a safe infrastructure for all residents, as well as public safety. One project that is critical to me is providing a warming shelter and whether we ensure support to Lincoln City’s most vulnerable residents. I love this community, and I and excited to have the opportunity to serve the community — especially those who need a helping a hand.

Question 2: In fact, dealing with Lincoln City’s increasing public service expenses and the mounting requests for financial aid from community organizations and nonprofits is enhancing the need for our city council, city budget committee, and our city mayor, to have the critical and effective background necessary in dealing successfully with such financial challenges?

Answer: The answer to this question has everything to do with prioritizing. We need to have a clear vision moving forward that guides these budget decisions. I have experience working with non-profits that will be extremely useful in making these decisions. I’ve served as part of a statewide non-profit in the housing sector, and that experience will give me the tools to make intelligent, informed decisions about how to allocate precious city resources. I also am a believer in the power of working together between the public and private sectors. When we all come together, we can pool our resources to create a better outcome that will benefit our residents through a more efficient, better-run government and effective delivery of services to those who need them most.

Question 3: We undedrstand that you, as a businessman, filed bankruptcy several years ago. We’d like to offer you the opportunity to explain that incident. We’d also offer you the opportunity to tell our readers how you are best prepared and qualified in financial issues to lead our city as Mayor through the next four challenging years.

Answer: I am not unlike most Lincoln City residents whom I would be honored to represent. Like many of us in this community, I and my family fell victim of the mortgage crisis of a decade ago and the corresponding recession. I did file for a personal bankruptcy. Big banks were filing for bankruptcies, as well, and on the advice of my attorney I filed bankruptcy to protect my family. But the truth is I fell victim to the mortgage industry’s corporate mismanagement and predatory lending practices of that time. Like many other Lincoln City residents, and people all over the country, I suffered the consequences of questionable loans being offered by banking industry giants like Fanny Mae and others. I’m not proud of it. It was a low point in my life. But I’ve rebounded significantly from that setback and am hoping to use that experience to create a better and more economically sound future for our city, which we all love.

Mayoral Candidate Forum

The video above is my speaking at the Mayoral Candidate Forum at the Sidedoor Cafe on September 25, 2018, which was presented by the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce. There was only one microphone for the event, so the audio isn’t that great. If you click on the ‘CC’ symbol, the closed captioning text may help.

Voters’ Pamphlet

Below is the text that appears in the Lincoln County Voters’ Pamphlet for my candidacy for Lincoln City mayor. You can also download the pamphlet from the Lincoln County website.

The ballots will be mailed out to all registered voters on October 18, 2018, and must be received by Election day, Tuesday, November 6, 2018. To register to vote up to October 16, please visit the Oregon Secretary of State’s MyVote page. To update, or verify, your registration, please visit here.


David Dahle
Nonpartisan

Occupation: Media Entrepreneur

Educational Background:
Delake Elementary; Oceanlake Elementary; David Douglas High School; Ricks College

Prior Governmental Experience:
Media Services – City of New- berg April 2010 – March 2012; Media Services – City of Keizer January 2017 – Present; Central Area Neighborhood Development Association – Salem – Board President 2015

Volunteer Organizations Supported
Local organizations helped with donated media services:
Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce
Lincoln City Cub Scout Pack 47
SOLV – Oregon Beach Clean Up Project
Bay Area Merchants Association
Lincoln City Warming Shelter
Back Packs For Kids – Lincoln City
Neighbors For Kids – Depoe Bay – Lincoln City
Meals on Wheels Lincoln City
Family Promise – Lincoln City
Taft Senior Night Fundraiser

In early June 2018, David Dahle was urged by Lincoln City residents to run for Mayor. He was reminded of his formative years in Lincoln City, where his family set early Roots to this coastal community. He is excited to return to his childhood home over these last few years and most importantly, honored and fortunate to run for Mayor. In 1970, his family bought the current Gerber Tire building. Since 1992 David has been a strong advocate for creating affordable housing for low income families, seniors and vulnerable residents. He returned home to LC and began publishing positive stories on LC residents and their communities since 2015. He is a strong supporter of rebuilding trust in our local government with a level of transparency and openness.

David Dahle has the heart and compassion to listen to the people of our town and the experience and relationships to make real change.” -Barbara Gurrola – Lincoln City 30 Year Resident

Having grown up in our town, David Dahle has a profound respect for the past and has a keen vision for the future.” -Vickie Sue Kramer (Daughter of Eleanor Kramer of Eleanor’s Undertow) – 68 Year Lincoln City Resident

DavidDahleForMayor.com


Video Introduction

I’m David Dahle and I’m running for Mayor of Lincoln City. I grew up here and I attended Delake Elementary and Oceanlake Elementary. I’ve gone on to do great things in life and gained experience by leading people and statewide organizations. Over the next few weeks you’ll learn more about me on this site, via Facebook, in your drive way, at your business or organization. I love this town as I’ve published positive video interviews at www.LincolnCityTV.com since 2015 and I look forward to learning about more ways I can serve and build relationships.